Greenkeepers – Know your area

I’m always shocked when I talk to course managers and find out that their greens are 1 Ha. It’s uncanny how greens dimensions are the same at so many places!

This week I was fortunate enough to talk to the Kent Bigga section at Hadlow college about the Evolution of disease management. It was a great afternoon and really nice to be welcomed back to Kent by some familiar faces.

I spent a little bit of time at the end talking about the “Sure-fire Wins”. These are the 100% cast iron guaranteed management practices that will give you a return on your time investment.

With technogoly now readily available to measure greens accurately there is no reason to not have an accurately measured area of the surfaces that you regularly apply products too.

There are many free mapping apps that will enable you to accurately measure your greens. But don’t just measure their exact area, measure them as you would spray them. It’s a little time consuming but well worth the effort. (A great job for that tech savvy apprentice on a frosty morning)

I generally find an additional 20% between the actual area of a green and sprayed area. This is of course influenced by a number of factors:

  • Operator experience
  • Sprayer type
  • Greens shapes

I’ve spoken before about the small margin for error in products and a sure fire way of getting the best from any product is ensuring you get the right amount down.

I can hear the words already “of course he’d say that he’s trying to sell us more syngenta products”. I understand completly why people choose to spray the “1 Ha” area – it’s because thats the amount that comes in the bottle and to purchase additional product means costs keep mounting up.

Well here’s my advice – if you only want to purchase 1 Ha’s worth – make sure you only spray 1 Ha. Measure accurately and apply only to that area. The areas left should be prioritised dependent on your site (spare green, chipping green, an area of green that are underutilised). I blogged about this a little while ago. Use these areas of your greens to communicate with your membership and justify how well your programme is working. A good control plot with no applications will really help you understand your program, disease pressure and help build an effective program for the future.

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